Literary Devices in The Chimney Sweeper - Owl Eyes.

Literary Devices in The Chimney Sweeper. Metonymy: Metonymy is a figure of speech that describes an object or person by comparing it to something else to which it is closely related. In the poem, Blake uses metonymy to signify Tom Dacre’s innocence. Blake describes Tom’s hair, comparing it to a lamb, and describing how Tom’s innocence is lost when his hair is shaved. Motif: Blake uses.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

William Blake The Chimney Sweeper Poetic Devices. William Blake’s two poems “The Chimney Sweeper” in his books “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience” are centered on young children lives as chimney sweeps and the difficulties that come of the job, especially at such a young age. The poems are told from two different viewpoints, as the books titles suggest, one from.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

William Blake's The Chimney Sweeper William Blake's The Chimney Sweeper, written in 1789, tells the story of what happened to many young boys during this time period. Often, boys as young as four and five were sold for the soul purpose of cleaning chimneys because of their small size. These children were exploited and lived a meager existence that was socially acceptable at the time. Blake.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake. William Blake. The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake. Prev Article Next Article. In 1789 (the year of the beginning of the French Revolution), Blake brought out his Songs of Innocence, which included The Chimney Sweeper. The poem is in first person, about a very young chimney sweeper who exposes the evils of chimney sweeping as a part of the cruelties.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

William Blake wrote two versions of his poem “The Chimney Sweeper”, firstly in 1789 and secondly in 1794. They both describe the lives of children as chimney sweeps. Three poetic techniques carefully explored by Blake are imagery, tone and diction to bring a sense of sympathy to his audience. Though these poetic techniques are handled in both poems, they are shown through different.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

In “The Chimney Sweeper” of Songs of Innocence, Blake uses various poetic devices—including metaphor, repetition, anaphora, metonymy, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and multiple meanings—to bring his readers into the terrible existence of all chimney sweepers. Blake denies his readers, or his young subjects, a happy ending unless they realize they must “do their duty” as given by God.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

Analysis of Poetic Devices in “The Chimney Sweeper” Poetic Devices refer to those techniques a poet uses to bring uniqueness in his text. The analysis of some of the poetic devices used in this poem is given below. Stanza: A stanza is a poetic form of some lines. There are five stanzas in this poem; each comprises four lines.

William Blake The Chimney Sweeper Poetic Devices Free Essays.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

Being a chimney sweeper is just about as bad a life as a kid could choose. And, if you're Blake, the plight of the chimney sweeper is a grave injustice. These kids have no say in their lives. According to Blake, they've been abandoned by their parents, by the Church, by the government, and even by God. In other words, it ain't a nice world to grow up in. And yet, that's exactly the world this.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

The second Chimney Sweeper poem by William Blake had to do with experience. Even though both poems have the same title doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re the same. They have a few things in common, but also have a plethora of items that are different. In both poems called “The Chimney Sweeper”, they share similarities and differences between narration, rhyme scheme, tone, and theme.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

The poem The Chimney Sweeper from Songs of Innocence is about two children who are forced to work as sweepers in a Chimney. One of them was sold by his father after the death of his mother. The other child namely Tom Dacre cries when his head is shaved. The first child tries to console him. In the following night, Tom sees a dream in which he is assured of a better future in the afterworld.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

If you write a school or university poetry essay, you should Include in your explanation of the poem: summary of The Chimney-Sweeper: When My Mother Died I Was Very Young; central theme; idea of the verse; history of its creation; critical appreciation. Good luck in your poetry interpretation practice! Pay attention: the program cannot take into account all the numerous nuances of poetic.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

The black coffins, the soot of the chimney, and the skin of the chimney sweeper covered in ash signify a loss of innocence. White is often associated with innocence in Christian symbolism, so the vivid imagery of darkness stands in direct contrast. Images of darkness accompany the children’s work as chimney sweepers, implying that the causes of their loss of innocence are the labor and the.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

The contrast between innocence and experience is portrayed in Blake’s poems Infant Joy, Infant Sorrow and The Chimney Sweeper (innocence), The Chimney Sweeper (experience) through the use of metaphors, symbolism, imagery, juxtaposition, emotive language, repetition, alliteration and assonance. This essay will examine the notions of innocence and experience through references to the poetic.

Poetic Techniques In The Chimney Sweeper Essay

Though these poetic techniques are handled in both poems, they are shown through different perspectives. In both versions of the poem, images of death are depicted similarly using the color black. In the 1789 version, the speaker says that chimney sweeps are “lock’d up in coffins of black” and in the 1794 version, the speaker mentions that there is a “little black thing among the snow.”.

William Blake's The Chimney Sweeper Essay - 672 Words.

The Chimney Sweeper By William Blake Poem Analysis Unlike the one in Songs of Innocence, The Chimney Sweeper, in Songs of Experience is very dark and pessimistic. This poem also seems to be very judgmental and gives motives for everything, but unlike Song of Innocence, the sweeper in this.Blog. 5 May 2020. Celebrating Prezi’s teacher community for Teacher Appreciation Week; 5 May 2020. Single sign-on (SSO) now available for Prezi Teams.The Poem is narrated by an unidentified chimney sweeper who starts off telling the reader about how he got into the chimney sweeping business (orphan, child laborer, possibly homeless). He then introduces Tom Dacre who seems to have a negative attitude on chimney sweeping.


Analysis of “The Chimney Sweeper” by William Blake “The Chimney Sweeper”, by William Blake begins with a child telling the story of his own life of being sold into slavery by his father. He explains how he was sold very young after his mother’s death before he could barely even cry. As the title states, the boy was sold to be a chimney sweeper. The child then goes into telling the.Like Tom Dacre of the earlier poem, the chimney sweeper is crying. When asked where his parents are, he replies, “They are both gone up to church to pray.” The boy goes on to explain that his appearance of happiness has led his parents into believing that they have done no harm in finding him work as a chimney sweep, but the boy knows better. He says they taught him to “wear the clothes.